The pond seasons: July

The old pond after adding a bit more clean sand to the middle shallows that divide the three basins: left is the 'deep' pool, currently about 15 cm; right is the 'middling' pool; front is the shallow pool

The old pond after adding a bit more clean sand to the middle shallows that divide the three basins: left is the 'deep' pool, currently about 15 cm; right is the 'middling' pool; front is the shallow pool

July in the pond

Water levels are dropping; this is the time of year when ponds which are going to dry out will do so. Maybe one of my three separate basins will eventually dry out (it’s what the pond was designed to do, to maximise habitat diversity in the space).

The water is still crystal clear.

The early dragonflies and damselflies have mostly emerged now. I’ve seen the first of the summer dragonflies, a Common Darter, emerging.

My bulrushes are putting up new shoots – I’ve got 7 now!

Tadpoles are still in the pond, growing slowly and providing occasional meals for backswimmers.

The summer generation of pond olive mayfly larvae are growing – the eggs were laid in the spring, the adults will emerge later in the summer, lay eggs and then the next generation of larvae will grow over winter.

This seasons baby water snails are also beginning to grow: I have three species now: dwarf pond snail, whirlpool ram’s-horn and white ram’s-horn. I’ve no idea how they got to the pond. They have not come in on plants (I’ve not brought any plants in), and I haven’t brought in mud or water. Birds? Frogs?

Advertisements

2 Responses to “The pond seasons: July”

  1. Christine Says:

    Hi

    I just wanted to leave a comment, because there did not seem to be many being left. I wanted to let you know that we were out here, reading you, and liking what we read. We have bought a large acreage in Australia, and we want to get a swimming pool built, but we want to link it to a pond system, so that we won’t have to use chemicals. I am reading your blog, looking for info etc. Any links that you could point me to that might be of interest to us would be most appreciated.

  2. Jeremy Biggs Says:

    Hi Christine

    Thanks for the kind words.

    I’ve met a couple of people in this country who specialise in making swimming ponds, though I think it is actually a world-wide industry now, and quite technical with pumps and gravel filters rather than simply groups of natural ponds.

    Mind you, if you’ve got an unpolluted water supply (especially no contamination by farm runoff) and there are no disease sources from sewage, and no crocs, if you make a nice pond you could just swim in it anyway! But I guess you’re also paying for the hard landscaping side too when you do a natural swimming pond.

    Two links to people in UK who might have some relevant local contacts for you:
    http://www.aqualandscapedesign.co.uk/natural-swimming-pools.asp
    http://www.theswimmingpondcompany.co.uk/contact.html

    If you’ve got plenty of space could you also make some real wild natural ponds with wildlife in mind? Making clean water pond complexes (like our Million Ponds Project) would create something very like what you have in Australia in billabongs, and groups of temporary ponds and wetlands.

    Given the current threats to the Australian water environment you would be doing your bit to counter some serious problems.

    Btw I’d be interested to hear more about your patch.

    Jeremy

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: