Amazing caddis fly pictures

Just hatched caddis fly larvae in a blob of jelly on a leaf (© Beat Oertli)

Just hatched caddis fly larvae in a blob of jelly on a leaf (© Sandrine Angelibert)

A bit closer (© Sandrine Angelibert)

Now you can begin to make out the animals

Now you can begin to make out the animals (© Sandrine Angelibert)

And closer still

And closer still (© Sandrine Angelibert)

And finally as close as we can get

And finally as close as we can get (© Sandrine Angelibert)

Caddis flies are moth like animals with aquatic larvae. Most people (including biologists) hardly ever see the adults but the larvae are much easier to find.

These wonderful pictures taken by Sandrine Angelibert in Switzerland show the recently hatched eggs of a caddis fly, stuck to a leaf in a blob of jelly overhanging the water at the edge of a pond.

The larvae hatch and drop into the water after a short time.

Its a classic example of why its worth having trees and shrubs around ponds.

There are about 250 different species of caddis in Britain alone, and they live in all kinds of freshwater from tiny temporary ponds to rushing mountain torrents (one even lives on dry land in the Wyre Forest area in the West Midlands)

Many carry cases; some do not. These babies haven’t yet had a chance to make their first case.

In my pond I’ve seen one tiny caddis so far – it was a pretty exiting event to find one of a group of animals that we never normally see in garden ponds.

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2 Responses to “Amazing caddis fly pictures”

  1. neil Says:

    Just seen this post. Brilliant photos!

    Interesting you mention that few have seen the adults. I came across a number of them along the lake/river banks at Pensthorpe Nature reserves a few weeks ago, and we had one turn up in a minibeast hunt once here in Essex. However when we have run moth traps, especially near ponds, the caddisflies are often the most common animal except for midges!

  2. Jeremy Biggs Says:

    Yes – mothers (that’s moth-ers not mothers) are probably the people who see more caddis than anyone else, except perhaps fly fishing anglers, and freshwater biologists!

    Jeremy

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